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50 Basketball Dribbling Drills to Do at Home by Yourself

There are some common complaints every basketball mentor and parents, whose children play basketball, have heard their aspiring young prodigies to throw at different stages of their adolescence.

Few of the common complaints include, "There is no suitable place to practice at home," "I don't feel like training at home," or "How can I train at home if there isn't any basketball hoop?"

The reasons above or excuses, as they might rightly be called, are heard very frequently from the young guns. These excuses are not exactly the fault of the children.

We, as the parents or mentors, must guide them to the right path and should show them ways how they can still train even if the place is not suitable enough.

With just a basketball at home and a lot of time, effort and perseverance, you can quickly get pretty good at the game of basketball, with the help of a few tricks and dribbles.

50 Basketball Dribbling Drills to Try at Home

In this article, we will be talking about 50 such dribbles or basketball handling drills that all of you can try at home.

Don’t worry if you are merely an aspiring basketball player trying out basketball by yourself because here, we will be going through some basketball dribbling drills for beginners that are also useful for anyone playing in the big leagues.

Then slowly, we will work our way to a few basketball dribbling workouts, solo basketball drills, basketball dribbling drills for guards as well as the best ball handling drills.

So, let’s take a look at the dribbling drills you can do at home by yourself.

1. Ball Slaps

This is more of a drill for your hands, to have better handling than anything else and not a trick you can use to dribble past your opponents in a real game of basketball. It will warm you up for a game, or at the very least, for the drills that we will be talking about later on, right here in this article.

Here, the player holds the steady ball right in front of their body (towards the middle) and slaps the ball hard with their hands while holding the ball with the other hand.

Persistence is important for this drill. The player does not even have to flail or move their arms around; rather, it's advised to keep the body stationary with the ball completely in front of the middle of the body and slap the ball hard.

The player would not ideally need more than a few tries to get the hang of this drill, and with each slap, they would try to get the stinging feeling upon contact with the ball.

2. Straight Arm Finger Taps

While keeping elbows locked, players tap the basketball quickly back and forth between two hands straight out in front of their faces. However, the catch is, as suggested in the name of the drill, players must use their fingers to do so, and must keep their arms completely locked from the elbow up and stationary.

This is another excellent ball handling drill and is quite commonly used by ballplayers all over the world.

Players will eventually get very good at it (should not take more than a few minutes) and when they do, they can go for the advanced techniques such as moving the ball up and down instead of just juggling it from one hand to another sideways. Players can benefit greatly by practicing this ball handling drill daily.

3. Wraps – Around Ankle

Here, the player has to keep a hold of the ball and figuratively tie the ball around the lower legs or ankles as fast as possible. What the player has to do here is pass the ball to the free hand while moving both hands in a circular motion around the ankles or lower legs.

This can be quite the advanced ball drill technique for new, aspiring basketball players, as they are not allowed to let the ball touch the ground while wrapping the ball around their ankles. Also, if a player fumbles the ball or drops it, he or she will need to start the drill over.

The s will not only help the player get a feel of the ball, but it will also increase the player’s balance while playing the game, allowing much more control of the ball in general.

4. Wraps – Around Waist

In this case, the player has to keep ahold of the ball and wrap the ball around the waist or mid-section region as fast as possible. What the player is doing here is passing the ball to the other hand while moving the hands and the ball in a circular motion around the waist.

One is not allowed to let the ball touch the ground while wrapping the ball around the waist, much like in the previous wrapping drill. He or she will need to start the drill all over again if they fumble or drop the ball.

This is not a very advanced drill, but it is very helpful since it’s important to get familiar with the ball and learn to maintain balance. It is because wrapping the ball around the waist keeps the ball from being dropped.

5. Wraps – Around Head

In this case, players have to keep a hold of the ball and just wrap the ball around their head region as fast as possible. This drill is simply passing the ball to the free hand while moving the hands in a circular motion around his head.

Just like the previous wrapping drills, this too helps in practicing balance, and similarly, you have to start the drill all over again if you drop the ball or fumble on it.

This drill will also help players keep the ball in pressure situations during real basketball matches, as they will be getting a lot of practice in not letting the ball drop.

6. Wraps – Around the world

This drill is perhaps the most advanced basketball ball handling drill among all wrapping drills and is probably the most advanced basketball drill in this list up to this point.

The drill combines the three wrapping drills that we talked about previously. Here, the player starts by wrapping the basketball around the head, then slowly, going downwards with the ball to the waist and finally, towards the lower legs or the ankles.

It is quite a tricky drill, and players have to make sure that they have genuinely mastered wraps around the ankle, mid-section, and head before they try the ‘wraps around the world’ drill.

This wrapping drill will primarily help the player with everything that we talked about in the previous wrapping drills but to an even greater extent because of how versatile the player has to be to move the ball all around his body. This is one of the best basketball handling drills or workouts.

7. Wraps – Figure 8 Around Legs

Here, the player has to keep ahold of the ball and wrap the ball around the legs as fast as possible in a figure eight motion. Basically, what the player is doing is actually passing the ball to one free hand while moving both hands in a circular figure eight motion around both the legs.

This can a very useful drill technique for an amateur basketball player, as one is not permitted to let the ball touch the ground while wrapping the ball in a pretzel around both legs. Needless to say, if the player fumbles the ball or drops it, he or she will need to start the drill all over again.

The figure 8 drill will help players gain more balance while dribbling the ball during real basketball matches. Moreover, this drill will help the player get more of a chance at getting better at dribbling past opponents during a basketball match.

8. Wraps – Around Right Leg

This drill will actually be very easy for the player who has already mastered quite a few s by this point. Here, after standing stationary with the right leg in front and the left leg in the back, the player basically has to wrap the basketball around the right leg in a circular motion as fast as possible.

If you are a player who has completed all the drills above, this drill should be quite easy for you and should serve as an excellent warm-up drill.

Much like in the previous wrap-around drills that we covered in this article, the player has to make sure that he or she doesn’t drop the ball or fumble it.

9. Wraps – Around Left Leg

At this point, wrapping the ball around your left leg should be an easy drill to follow. This is one is exactly the mirror image of #8. Here, after standing stationary with the left leg in front and the right leg in the back, the player basically has to wrap the basketball around his left leg in a circular motion as fast as possible.

Do not fumble on the ball or drop it. If you do, you’ll have to start over.

10. Wraps – Double Leg, Single Leg

The previous drills are only warm-ups when compared to this advanced basketball ball handling drill. The wrapping drill can be quite tricky as this one is much more complicated than the ones we have discussed up until this point.

Don’t worry though, because we will walk you right through it and help you every step of the way as to how you can perform this drill on your own.

To start, the player has to have their legs together in place, in a stationary position. Then, the player has to step their right leg in front and has to move that leg in a circular motion with the ball at hand.

Then immediately, the player has to quickly take a step backward and thus, their feet will get back together at that point and from that position, they have to wrap the basketball around both their legs.

Now, the player has to step in front with their other leg, wrapping the ball around it before jumping back together and wrapping the ball around both their feet. The player must keep on doing this process for as long as he can and as quickly as possible for maximum results.

11. Drops

Drops are another great basketball handling drill. In this drill, the player starts in a half-seated position. The player has to have both hands outstretched before the body (along with the basketball). This drill aims to have the ball drop between the legs of the player a couple of centimeters from the floor.

Then, the player bounces the ball just once and catches the ball behind the body once it goes between the legs and behind the player’s body. The player then has to drop the ball from behind the body and between the legs before catching it in front, getting back into the root or initial position.

This process has to be repeated more and more as the player gets better at it and grows more control overall. There are plenty of benefits of doing this ball handling drill.

It can help a lot with the player’s balance and will help improve the dribbling abilities of the player. More importantly, you do not even need a training buddy to help master this basketball trick.

12. Pound Dribble – Waist Height – Left Hand

As mentioned before, there is going to be a lot of similarities among certain types of dribbles and handling drills. We have already discussed a few kinds of pound dribbles, and this one is quite similar to the rest of them, concerning benefits and procedure.

In this basketball dribbling drill, the player has to kneel low and then has to start dribbling the ball with the left hand. The drawback here is that the ball should have to bounce up to the player's waist or mid-section instead of the ankles or lower legs like in a few previous drills.

So, the ball won't be able to bounce more than a couple of feet off of the ground before being dribbled back to the floor with the player's left hand.

The player will get better at dribbling the ball by practicing this drill. Also, as the player masters the pound dribble to perfection, the speed of the said dribble will also rapidly increase.

Pound dribble is an essential tool in helping the player learn how to stay low while dribbling.  As you can already tell by now, this is just the left-hand variation of the drill mentioned above.

13. Pound Dribble – Shoulder Height – Left Hand

We are now moving into the last pound dribble drill on this list. This is the shoulder height pound dribble variation with the player’s left hand.

In this basketball ball dribbling drill, it is not obligatory that the player kneels low.

So, one can start in a relatively neutral position. Firstly, he or she has to start dribbling the ball using the left hand. The ball must go up at least up to the player's shoulder height although it is reasonable to believe that the average basketball player cannot possibly dribble the ball up to more than the shoulder height.

So, the player basically has to pound the ball hard with the left hand in this variation to ensure that the ball is bounced back to the shoulder height. The player will get better at dribbling the ball by practicing this drill.

Also, as the player masters the pound dribble to perfection, the speed of the said dribble will also rapidly increase. A pound dribble is an essential tool in helping the player learn how to stay low while dribbling. 

14. Machine Gun

This is one drill that every amateur basketball player must try out and should master. This is not one of those basketball dribbling drills that will make the player instantaneously better at dribbling and help keep the guards away from the ball.

But, this drill is, in fact, a great basketball handling workout to warm yourself up and get your hands, fingers and body posture ready to start a great game of basketball.

To start, the player has to lower himself almost to the floor and has to switch between his hands to dribble and make the ball stay as low to the ground as humanly possible.

Another thing the player must keep in mind is that he or she has to try to keep the ball down and in the same position. It should not be moving around too much when the player alternates between both hands.

15. Pound Dribble – Shoulder Height – Right Hand

We are now moving into the last two-pound dribble dribbling drills on this list. The first of the two is the shoulder height pound dribble variation. We will begin with right-hand variation.

In this basketball dribbling drill, the player basically does not have to kneel low, and won’t be required to go as low compared in the previous four basketball ball dribbling drills.

So, the player can start in a relatively neutral position. Then, he has to start dribbling the ball with his right hand.

The ball should bounce, at least, up to the player’s shoulder height instead of his ankles or waist like in the previous pound dribbling drills. It is highly unlikely that the ball will bounce beyond the shoulder height of the player, but it is mandatory for the ball to reach the shoulder height.

Therefore, the player chiefly has to pound the ball hard with the right hand to ensure that the ball bounces back to the shoulder height.

16. Straddle Flip

This is perhaps another handy and popular basketball handling drill. To perform the straddle flip, the player should first master or at least know well how to implement the drill we discussed above, the drops. It is because the straddle flip is similar to the drops to a certain extent.

To start this drill, the player has to be in a position similar to the drops drill (at a squat position). But, instead of having the ball and both hands in front of the body, the player will have to begin with a hand in the front of the body and the other hand at the back of the body.

The player must hold the ball between his two legs. At that point, to perform the drill, the player has to quickly alternate the ball from one hand to the other while switching hands from the back to front and vice versa.

Like in all of the wrapping drills that we already covered, the player must be careful not to drop the ball because otherwise, he or she would have to start the drill all over again. This is another common solo basketball drill that you can master at home.

17. Pound Dribble – Waist Height – Right Hand

As aforementioned, all drills in this list only need the use of a ball and some determination. This pound dribble is no exception and can be easily practiced at home by an amateur basketball player.

In this basketball dribbling drill, the player basically has to kneel low, but won't be required to go low like in the previous two basketball ball dribbling drills.

Then, he or she has to start dribbling the ball with the right hand. The catch here is that the ball should bounce up to the player’s waist or mid-section instead of the ankles or lower legs like the previous two drills.

Therefore, the ball won’t be able to bounce more than a couple of feet at most before being dribbled back to the floor with the player’s right hand.

The player will get better at dribbling the ball by practicing this drill. Also, as the player masters the pound dribble to perfection, the speed of the said dribble will also rapidly increase.

Pound dribble is an essential tool in helping the player learn how to stay low while dribbling. 

18. Spider Dribble 

This drill is another one of the great basketball handling drills that we will be covering in this article. This is also one of the many essential exercises required to be practiced at home by all aspirant basketball players trying to get better.

The player has to start with their knees apart at around shoulder width, and they also have to be bent at the knees so that the player is lowered down. The ball has to remain below or underneath the player’s body the whole time the player is performing the drill.

Then the player must dribble the ball with both hands; first the right, then the left. The player will then have to move each of the hands behind the knees, one by one for dribbling the ball.

As soon as dribbling the ball behind the player’s knees is completed, the player must reach back in front of the body for more dribbles. Afterward, the player has to continue the drill as fast as possible.

19. Pound Dribble – Right Hand – Ankle High

Starting with this basketball ball handling drill for beginners, we are entering another pattern of drills that you will get to read about within the next couple of entries in this list.

Like with the other drills in this list, all a basketball player will require to do this drill is a ball. Gradually, he can learn to do these next few solo basketball drills at home and can actually master them all by themselves.

In this basketball dribbling drill, the player basically has to kneel as low as possible and start dribbling the ball with the right hand.

The catch here is that the ball should only bounce up to the ankle or lower leg, and no higher than that of the player's right ankle. So, the ball won't be able to bounce over two inches from the floor before being dribbled back to the ground with the player’s right hand.

The drill will help the player get better at dribbling the ball; the speed will also improve drastically by the mastering of these pound dribble basketball drills. Finally, the aspiring player will also learn to stay and dribble low, getting an advantage in a real game of basketball.

20. Pound Dribble – Left Hand – Ankle High

In this basketball dribbling drill, the player has to kneel as low as he or she can and start dribbling the ball using the left hand. The catch here is that the ball should only bounce up to his or her ankle or lower leg, and no higher than that of the player’s left ankle.

The ball won't be able to bounce off of the floor by two inches before being dribbled back to the floor with the player’s left hand. As you can tell by the name and the description of this drill, it is basically a variation of the drill that we just covered, but done with the left hand instead of the right hand.

21. Dribble around Right Leg – Right Hand

To perform this drill with a basketball, what you have to do is start with a stance that is wider than a regular stance, with hands on the side.

Holding the wide and slightly low position from the waist down, the player then has to make sure the ball is low and relatively close to the ground. The player then has to start dribbling the ball in the circular motion around his or her right leg, using only his right hand.

This is one of the easier drills for someone practicing to improve their game very quickly. The player will get better at dribbling the ball with the help of this drill.

The speed of the dribble will also improve to quite an extent as the player goes on to master the drill. If a player is skilled at this particular drill, he or she will be easily able to dribble low on each side of the body.

22. Dribble around Left Leg – Left Hand

Now, let us move on with the list and go to the next dribble around basketball dribbling drill, the dribble around the left leg – the left-hand variation of the previous drill.

So, just like the previous drill, the player has to start with a stance that is wider than a regular stance, with hands on the side. Holding the wide and slightly low position from the waist down, the player then has to make sure the ball is low and relatively close to the ground.

The player then has to start dribbling the ball in the circular motion around his or her left leg, using nothing but his left hand.

23. Dribble Figure Eight

This basketball drill for beginners is slightly more complicated and harder to pull off than the previous two dribbling exercises or drills that we covered right here.

In the dribble figure eight drill, the player basically has to combine the previous two exercises, that is, dribble around the right leg with a right hand and dribble around the left leg with the left side, and do it consistently and continuously.

Players would have to start in a relatively wider stance, and then what they have to do is, while keeping their legs apart, give the ball enough room to travel in between the legs and then, start dribbling the ball around each of their legs in a circular figure eight motion.

The player has to continuously do this as fast as he or she can, and the dribbling will get better immensely. Since this one is a combination of two types of drills, the player who masters this drill will have a huge advantage against any opposing team in a real basketball match.

24. Kills – Right Hand

‘Kills’ is another great drill for all the basketball players. It will not only give the player an excellent warm up, but it will also help them to get the rust off getting a good feel of the ball.

To do this drill, the player has to start dribbling the ball down from the ankle and then with each dribble, he or she will have to let the ball bounce higher and higher with each bounce gradually.

Upon reaching the maximum height the player can control the ball, the player has to kill the ball on the very next drop by stopping the ball only a few inches off of the ground. The player then has to start dribbling the ball up from the ankle to the shoulder.

And this way, the player has to carry this drill on from this point on. One more thing about this drill is that, of course, like the name suggests, the player performs the whole drill by only using his right hand.

This basketball ball dribbling drill is not only great to get your heartbeat up, getting you ready and all warmed up for future drills that you might want to do, but this will also get your body prepared for a basketball game. So, there is absolutely no way you can skip doing this drill if you want to play basketball.

25. Kills – Left Hand

To do this drill, the player has to start dribbling the ball, down from his ankle and then with each dribble; he will have to let the ball bounce higher and higher with each bounce gradually.

When the ball reaches the maximum controllable height, the player has to kill the ball by stopping the ball only a few inches off of the ground. The player then has to start dribbling the ball up from the ankle to the shoulder. And this way, the player has to carry this drill on from this point on.

It is exactly like the previous drill, but this time, with the left hand.

26. Crossover Dribble

Crossover dribbles are yet another ordinary basketball ball dribbling drill, practiced by players of all levels. This is, however, a much more complicated and advanced level drill for a player who is just starting.

So, before the player moves on to this dribbling drill, he should have all the previous drills, as mentioned, learned and mastered.

In this drill, the player basically has to continuously cross the basketball in front of their body, from one hand to another. And while doing the crossover dribble, the player also has to make sure that he’s crossing over as wide as he possibly can on this drill.

This drill will improve the player’s dribbling skills as well as improving his or her balance.

27. Behind the Back Dribble

This ball dribbling drill, or ball handling drill, is mainly another basic or fundamental technique and is also just a variation of the crossover dribble. Here, the player basically has to crossover the ball behind the body, making it bounce in the behind while swapping hands.

In a nutshell, the player will have to hold the ball with one hand, drop it and make it bounce behind the body, then grab the ball with the other hand on the other side of the body. This encloses all the benefit of the crossover dribble drill, and the player can get even better at ball handling and dribbling with the help of this one.

28. Scissors – Alternating Between the Legs

To do this dribble or dribbling drill, the player starts with their right foot in front and the left foot in the back. Then, the player should dribble the ball in between the legs, and every time he or she dribbles the ball, he or she should also swap the feet positions.

What this means is that with the first dribble, as the ball bounces, the player should move the left leg forward and the right leg back. He or she then has to continue with this process with each dribble.

This should help the player dribble better as well as get more agile and light on his feet. This is yet another very commonly used dribbling drill for basketball players.

29. 3-Dribble Crossover

This basketball ball dribbling drill is necessarily a hybrid of the pound dribbling drills and the crossover drills that we have already covered in this article. To perform this drill, the player has to start in a motionless or stationary position.

He or she will then pound the ball or make it bounce on the ground three times, before crossing the ball over in front of the body. Finally, the player pounds the ball three more times before crossing back the ball in its original position.

The player has to remember to pound the ball as hard as possible, and this drill is designed to help with the strengthening of hands.

30. 3-Dribble Through the Legs

This basketball ball dribbling drill is a combination of the pound dribbling drills and the crossover drills that we already covered in this article. To perform this drill, the player has to start in a stationary position.

The player then pounds the ball or makes it bounce on the ground three times. Then, he or she has to cross the ball over in between the legs and then pounds the ball three more times before crossing back the ball in its original position, that is, in between the legs.

It is to be noted that the player has to remember to pound the ball as hard as possible. Hence, this drill will surely help him or her by strengthening the hands.

31. 3-Dribble Behind the Back

This drill is basically a variation of a couple of basketball ball handling exercises for beginners, which we already covered above in this list.

To perform this drill, the player has to start in a quiet or stationary position. He or she will then pound the ball or make it bounce on the ground three times. Then, the ball needs to be crossed over behind the back.

Next, the player has to pound the ball three more times behind the back before crossing back the ball in its root or initial position, meaning in front of the body.

The player must pound the ball as hard as possible to strengthen hands. This may prove to be a real advantage in an actual basketball match. 

32. Triples – Crossover, Through the Legs, Behind the Back

The dribbling drill is a bit more complicated and harder to perform than the last three are, that we covered right here. This is solely because it combines the three dribbling drills.

It is a handy and useful ball handling drill or basketball dribbling drill that is very often used in practices.

To perform this drill, at first, the player must do the cross over, before immediately passing the ball between the legs, and then behind the back. The player then has to dribble the ball through his legs to complete this drill one time.

This sequence has to be continued and done as fast as possible to get the maximum result, which will give the player a significant boost in speed, agility, and dribbling.

33. Front V Dribble – Right Hand

Now we will be moving on to the V Dribble drills. These drills are extremely popular; each variation of this drill is supposed to help the player get better at dribbling, and will help the player get out of tricky situations during real basketball matches.

This is an essential dribbling and handling drill for any amateur basketball player and is quite often practice by basketball players at all levels.

To perform this basketball dribbling drill, the player has to dribble the basketball from one side to the other side of the body, while making sure that the ball is always in front of the body and that the dribbles are being performed in a V-shape motion.

Also, as the name suggests, the player can only use one hand to do this drill, and it will have to be the right hand.

34. Front V Dribble – Left Hand

Now we will be moving on to the left-hand variation of the V Dribble drills. Not only is this drill very trendy, but it is also supposed to help the player get better at dribbling, even helping them get out of tricky situations in times of real basketball matches.

To perform this basketball dribbling drill, the player has to dribble the basketball from one side to the other of the body while making sure the ball is always in front of his body, and the dribbles are in a V-shape motion.

Also, as the name suggests, the player can only use one hand to do this drill, and it’ll be the left hand.

35. Side V-Dribble – Right Hand

After the front dribbles come to the side ones. The side v drill is even more popular and helps the players learn how to get out of tricky situations during basketball matches all the time.

Not only is this drill practiced by amateur players, but it is also famous among seasoned basketball players as well as retired ones.

To perform this basketball dribbling drill, the player has to dribble the basketball from in front of the body to the back of it and then back in front. While performing the training, he or she has to make sure that the ball is always on the side (right side in this case) of the body and that the dribbles are in a V-shape motion.

36. Side V-Dribble – Left Hand

This is the left-hand variation of the side V Dribble drill. Not only is this drill very trendy, but it is also supposed to help the player get better at dribbling, even helping them get out of tricky situations in times of real basketball matches.

It is an essential dribbling and handling drill required for all aspiring basketball players to follow through with.

To perform this basketball dribbling drill, the player has to dribble the basketball from in front of the body to the backside and then pass the ball back to the front of the body. It is to be noted that the player must remember to always keep the ball on the left side and perform the drill in a V shape motion.

37. Freestyle

As the name suggests, this is a freestyle drill. So, there is no hard and fast rule for the procedure. In the freestyle play, the player is meant to combine as many exercises, dribbles, handling drills as he knows and string together a sequence of drills that are the most creative and effective (according to the player).

No two freestyling sequences look precisely the same. The player is encouraged to be as creative as possible, and he or she should make sure that the opposing team members aren't reading the dribbles.

This will be effective in a real game of basketball as it will make players more creative, and teach them practical ways of getting out of pressure situations and winning against defenders in matches.

38. Double Pound at Ankle Height

Now we will be moving on to a few drills, that won't be used in games, but will prove to be very useful in getting the players better at dribbling. These drills also help players become better at reacting solely because these stationary dribbling drills require the use of two basketballs instead of one.

To perform this basketball ball dribbling drill, the player has to hold one basketball in each of his hands. Then, the player has to pound both of the balls as hard as he or she can, down to the ground and then, stop the ball with the hands when it is bouncing back up.

The player has to make sure he or she is staying pretty low and is stopping the bounce when it is only a few inches off the ground. After finishing the ball at the ankle height, both balls have to be pounded back to the ground.

Then, the entirety of exercise has to be continued, to successfully finish this drill. This double ball drill is more effective than other drills when it comes to the question of benefits. Moreover, players learn to become more aware.

39. Double Pound at Waist Height

To perform this basketball ball dribbling drill, the player has to hold one basketball in each hand.

Then, the player has to pound both of the balls as hard as possible down to the ground and after that he or she has to stop the ball with hands when it is bouncing back up.

The player has to make sure that they are staying motionless and stationary and is stopping the bounce when it is only a couple of feet off the ground.

After stopping the ball at the waist height, both balls have to be pounded back to the ground, as hard as possible. The player must repeat the process again and again to complete the drill. This double ball drill is more beneficial than other drills as players learn to become more aware.

40. Double Pound at Shoulders Height

To perform this basketball dribbling drill, the player has to hold one basketball in each hand. Then, the player has to pound both of the balls down to the ground as hard as he or she can. Now, the player must stop the ball with hands when it is bouncing back up.

It is to note that the player has to make sure he or she is staying stationary and is stopping the bounce when it is only a few feet off the ground.

After stopping the ball at a height close to the head, both the balls need to be pounded back to the ground as hard as possible. This process then has to be continued again and again to be good at this drill.

This double ball drill will help with other drills as well as improving the reaction time of players.

41. Double Pound Alternating

In this drill, the player starts with each of the balls at a height he or she is comfortable in, and then the player has to alternate between the two balls as he or she starts dribbling. Again, these double ball drills help with other techniques as well as with the level of awareness of a player. 

42. One High/One Low

To do this exercise, the player starts with each of the balls at a height he is comfortable in, and then, the player has to alternate between the two balls while dribbling with each hand.

Here, the player has to dribble one ball up to the ankle and the other up to the shoulder, and then, switch arms with each of the two dribbles.

This is a very tricky drill where a player needs a very high level of concentration and mental strength to continue at two things with different patterns.

43. Double Wall Dribbling

The player starts with each of the balls at a height he is comfortable in, and then, the player has to simultaneously dribble both the balls on a wall at the height close to the shoulder. Again, these double ball drills include all the other benefits that come with other types of drills, combined with more awareness in a player.

Not only is this drill practiced by amateur players, but it is also famous among players who are seasoned and playing in the big leagues and earning big money.

44. 3 Dribble Double Crossover

In the 3-dribble double crossover drill, the player has to pound dribble the two basketballs thrice and then; the player has to cross both the balls over, simultaneously. The player then has to pound the balls three more times (for three dribbles) before he can cross over at the same time again.

Again, these double ball drills help with the other drills in this list. It also increases the level of awareness of a player. 

45. 3 Dribble Through the Legs/Crossover

In this drill, the player has to pound dribble the two basketballs thrice and then the player has to cross one of the balls over in front of the body while the other ball is simultaneously sent through the player's legs. These two actions must be followed through at the same time.

Next, the player has to pound the ball another three times (for three dribbles) before crossing over at the same time again, with alternating hands and positions. Again, these double ball drills help with other techniques as well as with the level of awareness of a player. 

46. 3 Dribble Behind the Back/Crossover

In this drill, the player has to pound dribble the two basketballs thrice and then the player has to cross one of the balls over in front of the body while the other ball is instantaneously crossed over behind the player’s back.

This must be done simultaneously. Then, the player has to pound the ball another three times for three dribbles before he or she can cross over at the same time again, but with alternating hands and balls.

The double ball drill is more beneficial than other drills as players learn to become more aware.

47. Two Ball Figure Eight

The two ball figure eight is a very complicated drill and very tough to pull off, especially for amateurs. The balls have to be kept as close to the ground as possible by the player. Then the player has to use the right arm to dribble one of the two balls around the right leg.

He or she, then, is to dribble the second ball with the left hand and around the left leg. This is then continued again and again until the player reaches perfection. The player must keep as low as possible and close to the ground.

Again, these double ball drills include all the other benefits that come with other types of drills, combined with more awareness in a player.

48. Double V Dribble in Front

For the double V dribble drill, the player has to dribble both the basketballs from one side to the other while dribbling them in front of the body. Also, it must be done in a simultaneous manner.

49. Double V-Dribble on Side

In the double V side-dribble, the player has to dribble both the basketballs from in front to the back of the body and vice versa, while dribbling the balls on the sides of the body.

This drill requires the player to be focused on the balls and his posture because for this exercise it is compulsory that the two dribbling is done simultaneously.

50. 2-ball Kills

This drill is similar to the previous “kills” drill that we covered in this article. It can be performed at different heights too, but the only difference here is that the kills are done with two balls instead of one.

For this kills variation, the player has to start dribbling the ball down from the ankle and then with each dribble, he or she will have to let the ball bounce higher and higher with each bounce gradually. With the other hand, the same form of dribble has to be maintained simultaneously.

Upon reaching the maximum height the player can control the ball, the player has to kill the ball on the very next drop by stopping the ball only a few inches off of the ground. The player then has to start dribbling the ball up from the ankle to the shoulder.

Conclusion

These are a few basic tricks and tips for basketball players at beginner levels. No one is going to magically become the next Michael Jordan with these basketball drills, passing techniques or even with the use of the app we recommended.

However, this will help a new player get the basics down and improve his or her overall game in basketball and slowly make them grow to be one of the bests in the game; only if he or she has the determination to see it through!

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